Book Review: The Deaths of Henry King & Fütchi Perf

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★ ★ ★

Without a doubt, this fulfilled my need for some dark humor in my life. It was just what I needed to help me get out of a book slump I was in for two weeks. The Deaths of Henry King by Brian Evenson, Jesse Ball, and illustrated by Lilli Carré. For me this was an introduction into the creators of this collaboration, and after reading this, I looked into more of their work because I wanted more. Lilli Carré’s illustrations are phenomenal, and she quickly became a favorite artist of mine after discovering her work in this book. This is not exactly a graphic novel, but it is sort of a small illustrated book with short paragraphs and gravestone-rubbing-style art. The Deaths of Henry King, simply put, is about one character dying over and over in some grim, but comical situations.

At certain points, I would make anyone around me listen while I read a few pages because it was too good not to share. Some grim, some hilarious, and some outright ridiculous deaths. Death by a cheddar cheese wheel? Eating six and a half pounds of glass? A visit from an angel that rips his heart out through his throat? It all happens within the 160 pages of The Deaths of Henry King.

The hapless Henry King, as advertised, dies. Not just once or twice, but seven dozen times. Each death a new demise, from the comic to the grim to the absurd to the transcendent and back again. With text by Jesse Ball and Brian Evenson complimented by Lilli Carré’s macabre, gravestone-rubbing-style art, Henry King’s ends are brought to a vivid life.

Hardcover, 160 pages
September 12th 2017 by Uncivilized Books

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★ ★

Fütchi Perf is Kevin Czap’s first long-form in print, told through a handful of short comics combined to assemble like an album. Set in Cleveland, in a near-utopian future, there are themes of community, feminism, and a diverse world that is accepting and letting the good flourish. It’s filled with close-knit friendships, life-changing basement shows, and a joyous artistic community. I am torn because this was close to a 3 star read but closer to a 2.5 because of some reasons that I’ll discuss further in the review–but I did like this, just not as much as I hoped. I read this not once, but twice, because I felt like the first time wasn’t enough to extract all that the comic had to offer–and still, I am a bit perplexed. It is disjointed with little story, and has a lot going on between the color palette, and crowded pages. I definitely felt a little claustrophobic while reading this, which added to the second time around reading it to make sure I didn’t miss anything. The artwork is cartoony with a vibrant bubblegum palette, displayed in flashes of scenes, that was fitting to the setting and the idealized, euphoria atmosphere of Cleveland.

I felt like this is one of those comics that really makes you stop and question a lot on how we think, the way society is verse how we would possibly like it to be, or how other’s may envision possible solutions to real life problems. I did love the premise of this, the characters, and all the diversity that is within it–you can feel the heart that went into crafting Fütchi Perf–but I had such a hard time really getting into it because of the layout, which did lower the rating I had in mind.

What if the future began in a small, queer, punk music show in the basement of a Cleveland, Ohio house? Romantic friendships, über-chic culture, magical solutions, kid think-tanks, and more. Fütchi Perf might not depict a perfect future, but its slice-of-life vignettes—drawn in a glorious, kaleidoscopic two-color palette—visualize a Utopian dream that seems almost real, but perpetually out of reach.

Paperback, 88 pages
October 10th 2017 by Uncivilized Books

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I received a copy in exchange for an unbiased review from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

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Book Review: Everything is Flammable by Gabrielle Bell

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★ ★ ★

Sometimes funny, sometimes sad, and often relatable, Everything is Flammable is a graphic memoir with raw storytelling, and simple art. After her mother’s home is destroyed in a fire, Bell returns to her hometown in rural Northern California to help her mother get things in order and buy a new home. Spanning through one year and touching on issues such as anxiety, financial hardships, and a tenuous relationship with her mother, Bell’s humor and brutal honesty unfold into a profound memoir. While certain topics in this were at times difficult to read, I think Bell captures the overwhelming and uncertainty of anxiety and just going through life with it on top of dealing with anything else that comes along.

The beginning was like an small introduction into Bell and her life, before getting into the aftermath of the fire, which I liked because it gave the readers more insight into who she is. The characters were portrayed in such a way that by the end, you want to know more about them, and where they went from there. The artwork is simple, dark, and engrossing–I actually went back just look through the pages and appreciate it. Everything is Flammable is a well crafted graphic memoir that, more me, was just the beginning look into Bell’s work, and I look forward to checking out more in the future.

Synopsis

In Gabrielle Bell’s much anticipated graphic memoir, EVERYTHING IS FLAMMABLE, she returns from New York to her childhood town in rural Northern California after her mother’s home is destroyed by a fire. Acknowledging her issues with anxiety, financial hardships, memories of a semi-feral childhood, and a tenuous relationship with her mother, Bell helps her mother put together a new home on top of the ashes. A powerful, sometimes uncomfortable, examination of a mother-daughter relationship and one’s connection to place and sense of self. Spanning a single year, Everything is Flammable unfolds with humor and brutal honesty. Bell’s sharp, digressive style is inimitable.

Hardcover, 160 pages
Published June 6th 2017 by Uncivilized Books

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I received a copy in exchange for an unbiased review from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The One Hundred Nights of Hero by Isabel Greenberg

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★ ★ ★ ★

In The One Hundred Nights of Hero, after a brief introduction into the prehistoric mythical world with three moons, we are transported to the empire of Migdal Bavel, where two friends make a bet: Manfred has one hundred nights to seduce Jerome’s wife, Cherry, while Jerome is out to sea–and if he wins, Jerome must forfeit the castle and his wife. Unknown to both men, Cherry is in love with her maid Hero. The two women have a plan: Hero, a member of the League of Secret Story Tellers, will distract Manfred with mesmerizing tales for 100 nights, keeping him at bay until Jerome returns.

I am still trying to untangle my thoughts from this graphic novel, but without a doubt, this is a wonderful read, and beautifully illustrated. I read this in one sitting a few nights ago, and as soon as I closed the book, I went on ramble about each story, the characters, and meanings behind it all because it left me feeling so much. It is about brave women, independence, love, sisterhood, and exquisite storytelling. It contains stories within stories that come together in the end, and fill you with empowerment and inspiration.

The artwork is stunning with muted tones, splashes of color, and Greenberg’s unique style, and makes for brilliantly telling of ancient tales. Hero tells simple stories while weaving traditions, folklore, and myths throughout each one. While getting lost within the pages, you’ll encounter faraway lands, empires, supernatural beings, explorers–and always, strong-willed, determined women who take no bullshit from men and will overcome anything. It is a tapestry of folk tale and myth retellings with modern twists, and although somber at times, there is also humor, insight, and wit.

Synopsis 

In the tradition of The Arabian Nights, a beautifully illustrated tapestry of folk tales and myths about the secret legacy of female storytellers in an imagined medieval world.

In the Empire of Migdal Bavel, Cherry is married to Jerome, a wicked man who makes a diabolical wager with his friend Manfred: if Manfred can seduce Cherry in one hundred nights, he can have his castle–and Cherry.

But what Jerome doesn’t know is that Cherry is in love with her maid Hero. The two women hatch a plan: Hero, a member of the League of Secret Story Tellers, will distract Manfred by regaling him with a mesmerizing tale each night for 100 nights, keeping him at bay. Those tales are beautifully depicted here, touching on themes of love and betrayal and loyalty and madness.

Hardcover, 224 pages
Expected publication: December 6th 2016 by Little, Brown and Company
I received a copy in exchange for an unbiased review from the publisher. All opinions are my own.